Registration is open! With a unique agenda of compelling speakers, and participants who will guarantee productive networking, you are an important addition to our 2019 Meeting & Colloquium. We will keep you posted as we complete the agenda, but we are excited to share the confirmations so far.

Important highlights include:
  • McNulty Foundation, including Anne Welsh McNulty addressing women’s leadership and her support for a major initiative with the Aspen Institute, and several key universities
  • NAS Science & Entertainment Exchange
  • NAS Action Collaborative in Preventing Sexual Harassment in Higher Education
  • AAAS featuring Shirley Malcolm and her leadership with SEA Change, Athena Project, L’Oréal, and more
In addition to some successful VCs and founders, we will also feature renowned research leadership including:
  • Susan Hockfield, MIT, with her new book The Age of Living Machines
  • Margaret Foti, American Association for Cancer Research
  • Rachel Green, Johns Hopkins
  • Cigall Kadoch, Dana Farber Cancer Institute
  • Tracy McKnight, Valerion Therapeutics, now at UCSF
  • Erin O’Shea, leading HHMI • Susan Solomon, New York Stem Cell Foundation
  • George Thibault, Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation
  • And award winners - Reshma Shetty, Ritu Raman, and Ellen Foxman
The meeting will take place at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, all day on November 20th with a special Women in Science Wistar presentation and reception featuring Kathrin Jansen, SVP at Pfizer, who led the development of the HPV vaccine. It will continue on November 21st through lunch. Space is limited so register ASAP and check for agenda updates and logistics here.

 
The Rosalind Franklin Society recognizes and celebrates the contributions of outstanding women in the life sciences and affiliated disciplines, promotes broadened opportunities for women in the sciences, and through its many activities motivates new generations of women to this calling.  The Society honors the achievements of Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958), a British x-ray crystallographer whose extraordinary work, though largely overlooked and under-appreciated at the time, was crucial to the discovery of DNA’s structure by James Watson and Francis Crick.  The powerful symbolism of her remarkable story drives the Society’s agenda.

The Rosalind Franklin Society is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3).