It was great!

Labs, Leaders, Critical Connections: RFS Virtual Meeting

An end of year virtual meeting hosted by the Rosalind Franklin Society, highlighted astounding accomplishments of women and minorities in science as well as significant challenges yet to be addressed.

From groundbreaking research to prestigious awards and recognition, this virtual event provided incredible access to emerging stars as well as those who continue to lead the way.

Sessions covered the academic world as well as industry; corporations and start-ups; and U.S. and international colleagues and partnerships.

The event took place online over two half-days: December 16th and December 17th from 1:00pm to 5:00pm EST.

Labs, Leaders, Critical Connections was produced with support from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), and OnRamp Bioinformatics, Inc.

You can access these great presentations here!

In case you missed our RFS/GEN Women in Science Webinar Series, you can watch them now:

The Life and Times of Rosalind Franklin: British biologist and author Dr. Matthew Cobb explores Franklin’s contribution to DNA structure and how they have been seen in popular culture.

The Empowerment of Having a Lab of One’s Own: Dr. Rita Colwell, president of the Rosalind Franklin Society, is a pioneering microbiologist and the first woman to lead the National Science Foundation. She is a Distinguished University Professor at both the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The Great Convergence: How Biology and Engineering Unite to Reshape our World. Renowned neuroscientist Dr. Susan Hockfield, who served as president of MIT from 2004–2012, shares her views of the future that she lays out in her recent book, The Age of Living Machines: How Biology Will Build the Next Technology Revolution.

Conversation with special guest Nobel Prize Laureate Jennifer Doudna, PhD (University of California, Berkeley/HHMI) was recently awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Emmanuelle Charpentier, PhD,  a microbiologist at the Max Planck Institute in Berlin. Doudna has embraced her leadership role, spearheading vital discussions about the ethics of hereditary genome editing, championing the value of basic academic research, and serving as an inspirational role model for women in science.   

 The Rosalind Franklin Society recognizes and celebrates the contributions of outstanding women in the life sciences and affiliated disciplines, promotes broadened opportunities for women in the sciences, and through its many activities motivates new generations of women to this calling.  The Society honors the achievements of Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958), a British x-ray crystallographer whose extraordinary work, though largely overlooked and under-appreciated at the time, was crucial to the discovery of DNA’s structure by James Watson and Francis Crick.  The powerful symbolism of her remarkable story drives the Society’s agenda.

The Rosalind Franklin Society is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3).